Moses Haughton the Elder

Sent in by Estelle Mzzposted to

While doing some research at Birmingham I came across a plaque to this guy at St Philips Cathedral and mentioned his interment at St Bartholomew’s Wednesbury, so here’s a good old Wednesbury famous guy who you can visit his grave when you are next at St Bartholomew’s .
Moses Haughton the Elder – engraver/painter and baptised on 27 March in 1735  at St Bartholomew’s .Church.          He trained as an enamel painter and was employed at the workshop of Hyla Holden in Wednesbury, before moving to Birmingham to work for John Baskerville and Henry Clay in 1761. He worked on enamelled, japanned and papier-mâché products.
In 1809, along with Samuel Lines he established a Life Academy in Peck Lane, a street leading out of New Street, close to what was the Free Grammar school (on a site now occupied by New Street Station).
This life school was so successful that in 1814 it was moved to a larger space in Union Passage. In this year it held its first public exhibition.
In 1821 the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists grew from this venture. Along with famous portraits and still life paintings of game, he also illustrated editions of the Bible in the late 18th Century.
Haughton was said to be of a “quiet and retiring disposition” and was not known much outside Birmingham during his lifetime.
He lived for many years at Ashted, outside the city. He died there on 24 December 1804 and was buried at St Bartholomew’s  Church Wednesbury, a marble monument with his portrait, sculpted by Peter Rouw can be seen erected on the wall of St Philip’s Cathedral Birmingham.
His son, Matthew Haughton, was an artist and engraver, and his nephew, Moses Haughton the younger (1773–1849), a painter and engraver.
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